Amsterdam University Press
Christ on a Donkey
Title
Christ on a Donkey
Subtitle
Palm Sunday, Triumphal Entries, and Blasphemous Pageants
Price
€ 105,00
ISBN
9781641892872
Format
Hardback
Number of pages
292
Publication date
Dimensions
15.6 x 23.4 cm
Discipline
History

Reviews

"Max Harris’ extremely well-researched book confronts the general understanding of Christ on a donkey ‘as a sign that he came neither as a warrior nor as one drawn to the trappings of power, but in peace and humility’ (p. 2) with the various ways in which the image was used in medieval and early modern theatrical tradition. His findings are stunning." - Cora Dietl, European Medieval Drama 22 (2018) "Once Harris gets the bit between his teeth in terms of his research target, he does not let go. He pursues his investigation with integrity and skill. His scholarly pursuit is achieved through a blend of acute observation, detailed analysis and first-rate field work." - Dr. Philip Butterworth, University of Leeds

Max Harris

Christ on a Donkey

Palm Sunday, Triumphal Entries, and Blasphemous Pageants

At once scholarly and entertaining, Christ on a Donkey is a study of Palm Sunday processions and related royal entries as both spectacular instances of processional theater and highly charged interpretations of the biblical narrative to which they claim allegiance. Harris’s narrative ranges from ancient Jerusalem to modern-day Bolivia, from imperial white horses to wheeled wooden images of Christ on a donkey, from veneration to iconoclasm, and from Christ to Ivan the Terrible. A curious theme emerges: those embodied representations of Christ’s entry into Jerusalem that were labeled blasphemous, idolatrous, or superstitious by those in power were arguably most faithful to the biblical narrative of Palm Sunday, while those staged with the purpose of exalting those in power and celebrating military triumph were arguably blasphemous pageants.
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Author

Max Harris

Max Harris is the author of five previous books, including Sacred Folly: A New History of the Feast of Fools (2011) which won the Otto Grundler prize. He has served as Executive Director of the Wisconsin Humanities Council and has taught at Yale University and the University of Virginia.