Amsterdam University Press
ARC – Places and Spaces, Medieval to Modern
Medieval Market by Matija Grguric
Available for Commercial Use via Flickr
Series editors

Catherine Clarke, University of Southampton
Keith Lilley, Queen’s University Belfast
Tadhg O’keeffe, University College, Dublin
Sabrina Corbellini, University of Groningen
Leonie Hicks, Canterbury Christ Church University
Jeremy Ashbee, English Heritage

Geographical Scope
Global
Chronological Scope
c.500-1500
Keywords
Medieval, urban, rural, space, landscape, place, heritage, geography, conservation, tourism, public Humanities
Series

ARC – Places and Spaces, Medieval to Modern

Discipline:History

Places and Spaces, Medieval to Modern is an exciting series that brings together new research and innovative approaches to explore the material and imagined landscapes, environments and locales through which people engaged with each other and their surroundings in the Middle Ages. In the context of the ongoing “spatial turn” in the arts and humanities globally, the series seeks to shape the field of medieval studies through connecting both academic and practitioner research across disciplines including history, geography, literature, architecture, archaeology, heritage science, and tourism studies, as well as those working in heritage conservation, management, interpretation, and marketing of medieval spaces and places today.

To achieve this, the series invites contributions which share an interest in exploring medieval spaces, places and spatial practices through the widest possible range of spatial and temporal contexts, from urban to rural environments, sacred to secular settings, real and imagined geographies, and in relation to diverse ethnic, social and cultural communities, as well as research which offers new perspectives on medieval spaces in the modern world. We welcome monographs, essay collections and minigraphs (45,000-60,000 words) from scholars, and from practitioners. Interdisciplinary work, multi-disciplinary essay collections, practice-led research, and proposals which seek to challenge other kinds of boundaries or divides in scholarship are particularly welcomed.

Commissioning editor