Making Places While Building Networks
Titel
Making Places While Building Networks
Subtitel
An exploration of the role of the urban environment in book publishing
Prijs
€ 43,95
ISBN
9789085550723
Uitvoering
Paperback
Aantal pagina's
184
Taal
Engels
Publicatiedatum
Afmetingen
156 x 234 cm
Categorie
Mediastudies
Inhoudsopgave
Toon inhoudsopgaveVerberg inhoudsopgave
MAKING PLACES WHILEBUILDING NETWORKS An Exploration Of The Role Of The Urban Environment In Book Publishing - 2 Table of contents - 8 1. Introduction - 12 2. Creative clusters in Berlin: entrepreneurship and the quality of place in Prenzlauer Berg and Kreuzberg - 28 3. Performing in Dutch book publishing 1880–2008: the importance of entrepreneurial experience and the Amsterdam cluster - 56 4. Place-making from publishing house to book fair: Dutch book publishers and the role of place in establishing trust and reputation - 86 5. Social networks and cultural intermediaries: the multiplexity of personal ties in publishing - 112 6. Conclusions - 138 References - 154 Nederlandse samenvatting - 176

Barbara Heebels

Making Places While Building Networks

An exploration of the role of the urban environment in book publishing

De onderstaande tekst is niet beschikbaar in het Nederlands en wordt in het Engels weergegeven.
The Amsterdam ring of canals is a much beloved location for Dutch book publishers. An exposition of the meaning of this urban environment for publishers adds to the existing knowledge on book publishers and their business locations. It also contributes to our understanding of the role of urban place in cultural production by looking at cultural production from a relatively unexplored angle – that of the cultural intermediary – and by conceptualizing place as a dynamic concept.
Publishers function as cultural intermediaries by bringing together the creation of cultural value and the selling of cultural products. An exploration of the meaning of urban place for cultural intermediaries in building reputation and trust in their personal networks with authors, booksellers, colleagues and the press, shows that place is more than geographical proximity and is not a static condition for knowledge spill-overs: it is a process, one that is interdependent on social networks.