Amsterdam University Press
ARC - East Meets West: East Asia and Its Periphery from 200 BCE to 1600 CE
California Rare Book School. History of the Book in East Asia.
Photo by Flickr user LWYang (CC BY 2.0).
Series editors

Prof. Stephen H. West, Arizona State University

Geographical Scope
East Asia, in its wider context
Chronological Scope
200 BCE – 1600 CE
Editorial Board

Profs. Joe Cutter, Arizona State University
Wei Keung Chan, Hong Kong Baptist College
Meow Hui Goh, Ohio State University
Yuming He, University of California, Davis
Paul Kroll, University of Colorado, Boulder

Keywords
Textual cultures of East Asia, material cultures of East Asia, intellectual cultures of East Asia, hemispheric exchange
Series

ARC - East Meets West: East Asia and Its Periphery from 200 BCE to 1600 CE

Discipline:History

The focus of East Meets West: East Asia and Its Periphery from 200 BCE to 1600 CE is the period roughly coterminous with Europe’s late antique, medieval, and Renaissance periods. The series welcomes manuscripts on the textual, material, and intellectual cultures of East Asia, as well as studies of hemispheric flows of ideas, texts, and artifacts between East Asian civilizations or between East Asia and other civilizations. The focus of research, however, must be on the role of a particular East Asian culture or cultures within that exchange.

The series is designed to provide maximum space for any apparatus, philological or otherwise, that provides a solid and informative cultural background for texts, visual images, or other objects. This is a rigorously peer-reviewed series. Manuscripts on literature, history, visual culture, or any other humanistic discipline that rely on a substantial presentation of text or image are particularly welcome, as are scholarly translations, with full notes and explanatory materials, of important texts largely unknown to a Western audience.

Submissions may be monographs or edited volumes of 70,000 or more words (particularly of interest in this regard are volumes which bring together the work of scholars from various disciplines and modern regions), or shorter “minigraphs” of 45,000 to 60,000 words.

Commissioning editor