Amsterdam University Press
Games and Play
Photograph of the game "I'd Hide You", Blast Theory, 2012. From the cover of Playful Identities: The Ludification of Digital Media Cultures (ed. Valerie Frissen, Sybille Lammes, Michiel de Lange, Jos de Mul, Joost Raessens)
Courtesy of Blast Theory
Series editors

Clara Fernández-Vara, New York University, USA
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Joost Raessens, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Geographical Scope
Global
Chronological Scope
Contemporary
Editorial Board

Prof. Aphra Kerr, Maynooth University, Ireland
Prof. Ben Schouten, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Prof. Emma Witkowski, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Prof. Eric Zimmerman, New York University, USA
Prof. Frans Mäyrä, University of Tampere, Finland
Prof. Jesper Juul, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design, Denmark
Prof. Kishonna Gray, Arizona State University, Glendale, USA
Prof. Mathias Fuchs, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany
Prof. Mia Consalvo, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
Prof. Miguel Sicart, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Prof. Souvik Mukherjee, Presidency University, Kolkota, India
Susanna Pollack, Games for Change, New York, USA
Prof. Tanya Krzywinska, Falmouth University, Woodlane, UK
Prof. Yasmin Kafai, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

Keywords
Games, play, playfulness, ludification of culture and society, interdisciplinarity, culture, communication, aesthetics
Series

Games and Play

Games and Play in Contemporary Culture and Society is a new international and interdisciplinary book series dedicated to game and play research.

Its primary focus is on the aesthetic, cultural and communicative aspects of games and play in our contemporary society. The series provides scholars with a peer-reviewed forum for their theoretical, analytical as well as historical contributions to the ongoing discussions on games and play.

The series is not limited to digital games; it includes play phenomena, both digital as well as non-digital; and it covers social-scientific, humanities, as well as industry and design approaches.

The proposed books should help readers understand the ‘ludic’ aspect of games and play−the ‘gameness’ of games and the ‘playfulness’ of play−without reducing games and play to mere applications or illustrations of other ideas or issues.

Commissioning editor