The University Socialist Club and the Contest for Malaya
Title
The University Socialist Club and the Contest for Malaya
Subtitle
Tangled Strands of Modernity
Price
€ 65,95
ISBN
9789089644091
Format
Paperback
Number of pages
350
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
15.6 x 23.4 cm
Category
History
Discipline
Asian Studies
Table of Contents
Show Table of ContentsHide Table of Contents
The University Socialist Club and the Contest for Malaya - 1 Contents - 8 Acknowledgments - 12 List of Photographs - 16 Abbreviations - 18 1 The Socialist Club and the Modernity Project - 20 2 Awake in the Bowl of Night - 42 3 The Fajar Trial - 62 4 Visionary of the Nation, Voice of Stifled Malayans - 82 5 A Beacon of Light on the Campus and Beyond - 106 6 Frankly Partisan in the Struggle for Student Leadership - 128 7 The Shadow over the Club - 154 8 Resisting Malaysia, Swansong for Malaya - 168 9 Long Night after Coldstore - 192 10 In Defence of University Autonomy and Student Rights - 210 11 Entwined Memories and Myths - 234 Conclusion: Modernity in Singapore and Malaya Reconsidered - 256 The University Socialists: Biographical Sketches - 266 Timeline of Events - 282 Notes - 288 Bibliography - 326 Index - 338

Reviews and Features

'This is an immensely compelling, informative and skillfully written account, informed by recent research, on the role of a formidable student movement in colonial Malaya and Singapore during the Cold War era and its active engagement in liberal democratic principles, the socialist ideology and the making of a new nation.' -- Dr Cheah Boon Kheng, (retired) professor of history at Universiti Sains Malaysia

'This study captures a brief Malayan moment in the history of Singapore and throws light on why the moment did not last. It is a strong example of alternative history in which losers’ stories are not only told but also help to correct official accounts. Remarkably, it also shows how historians juggle with memories of pain and regret as they try not to make new myths.' -- Wang Gungwu, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

'For those who value alternative histories of Singapore above and beyond the usual narratives of success and progress, this book delivers more than it promises' -- Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied, National University of Singapore

'This book is imperative reading for all wishing to have any understanding of the leftist politics in Singapore and Malaysia in the 1950s and 1960s and their relevance for politics today' -- Johan Saravanamuttu, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

'For those who value alternative histories of Singapore above and beyond the usual narratives of success and progress, this book delivers more than it promises.' -- Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied, National University of Singapore

The University Socialist Club and the Contest for Malaya

Tangled Strands of Modernity

The book, using a small group of left-wing student activists as a prism, explores the complex politics that underpinned the making of nation-states in Singapore and Malaysia after World War Two. While most works have viewed the period in terms of political contestation groups, the book demonstrates how it is better understood as involving a shared modernist project framed by British-planned decolonization. This pursuit of nationalist modernity was characterized by an optimism to replace the colonial system with a new state and mobilize the people into a new relationship with the state, according them new responsibilities as well as new rights.
This book, based on student writings, official documents and oral history interviews, brings to life various modernist strands – liberal-democratic, ethnic-communal, and Fabian and Marxist socialist – seeking to determine the form of postcolonial Malaya. It uncovers a hitherto little-seen world where the meanings of loud slogans were fluid, vague and deeply contested. This world also comprised as much convergence between the groups as conflict, including collaboration between the Socialist Club and other political and student groups which were once its rivals, while its main ally eventually became its nemesis.
Editors

Kah Seng Loh

Kah Seng Loh is a postdoctoral fellow at Kyoto University.

Cheng Tju Lim

Edgar Liao

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Guo-Quan Seng

Guo Quan Seng is a history PhD candidate at the University of Chicago.