Beyond the Pale
Title
Beyond the Pale
Subtitle
Dutch Extreme Violence in the Indonesian War of Independence, 1945-1949
Price
€ 39,95
ISBN
9789463726481
Format
Hardback
Number of pages
448
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
15.6 x 23.4 cm
Table of Contents
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1 For an introduction
1.1 Background, guiding principles and methodology (Gert Oostindie)
1.2 The political-historical context of Dutch policy on Indonesia, 1945-1949 (Gert Oostindie)
1.3 The military-historical context to Dutch policy on Indonesia, 1945-1949 (Gert Oostindie and Rémy Limpach)
Interim conclusions
INTERMEZZO
The human dimension. The search for stories about the Indonesian War of Independence (Eveline Buchheim, Fridus Steijlen, Stephanie Welvaart)
2 Research results
2.1 ‘Hatred of foreign elements and their “accomplices”.’ Extreme violence in the first phase of the Indonesian Revolution (17 August 1945 to 31 March 1946) (Esther Captain and Onno Sinke)
2.2 Revolutionary worlds. Legitimacy, violence and loyalty during the Indonesian War of Independence (Roel Frakking and Martijn Eickhoff)
2.3 ‘Information costs lives.’ The intelligence war for Indonesia, 1945-1949 (Rémy Limpach)
2.4 The Myth of the ‘Dutch Method’ Heavy Weapons in the Indonesian War of Independence (Azarja Harmanny)
2.5 The law as a weapon. The actions of the Dutch judiciary during the Indonesian War of Independence (Esther Zwinkels)
2.6 Silence, Information and Deception in the Indonesian War of Independence (Remco Raben and Peter Romijn)
2.7 Silence as a strategy. International visions of the Indonesian War of Independence (Jeroen Kemperman)
2.8 Beyond colonial guild rating. Dutch, British and French extreme violence in comparative perspective, 1945-1962 (Thijs Brocades Zaalberg en Bart Luttikhuis)
2.9 A guilty conscience. The painful processing of the Indonesian War of Independence in the Netherlands (Gert Oostindie en Meindert van der Kaaij)
3 To conclude
Conclusions
4 Epilogue
Dealing with the legacies of a violent past (Hilmar Farid)
Notes
Abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Further Reading
About the authors
Index

Beyond the Pale

Dutch Extreme Violence in the Indonesian War of Independence, 1945-1949

Indonesia declared its independence on 17 August 1945, two days after the Japanese capitulation that marked the end of World War II in Asia. Refusing to recognize Indonesian independence, the Netherlands attempted to gain control over the decolonization process by force, leading to four years of arduous negotiations and bitter warfare.

In 2005, the Dutch government declared that the Netherlands had been ‘on the wrong side of history’ and should not have engaged in this war. However, to this day, the government maintains its position from 1969 about violence at the hands of Dutch soldiers during this war: Yes, there had been ‘excesses’, but as a rule, the armed forces had behaved ‘correctly’. In recent years, this official position has increasingly, and more loudly, been called into question. In Beyond the Pale, conclusions of ten separate studies are presented from different perspectives, addressing the extent to which the Dutch armed forces used extreme violence on a structural basis and offering an assessment of their actions. The authors also examine how the Dutch government and society dealt with this extreme violence both during and after the war. Was it discussed, was it punished or covered up, and what developments does this reflect?
Authors

Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (KITLV)

During the research, the authors – Gert Oostindie, Thijs Brocades Zaalberg, Eveline Buchheim, Esther Captain, Martijn Eickhoff, Roel Frakking, Azarja Harmanny, Meindert van der Kaaij, Jeroen Kemperman, Rémy Limpach, Bart Luttikhuis, Remco Raben, Peter Romijn, Onno Sinke, Fridus Steijlen, Stephanie Welvaart, and Esther Zwinkels – were all affiliated with the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV), the Netherlands Institute for Military History (NIMH) or the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. The Indonesian historian Hilmar Farid wrote the epilogue.

Nederlands Instituut voor Militaire Historie (NIMH)

During the research, the authors – Thijs Brocades Zaalberg, Azarja Harmanny, Rémy Limpach and Esther Zwinkels – were all affiliated with the Netherlands Institute for Military History (NIMH).

NIOD Instituut voor Oorlogs-, Holocaust- en Genocidestudies

During the research, the authors – Eveline Buchheim, Martijn Eickhoff, Jeroen Kemperman, Remco Raben, Peter Romijn and Stephanie Welvaart – were all affiliated with the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies.